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Conan O'Brien visits Havana, Cuba.

FILE: Comedian Conan O’Brien performs during “End the Sentence: A Benefit for The Innocence Project” at Club Nokia on January 28, 2015 in Los Angeles, California. He’s filmed an episode of his show in Cuba. (Photo by Taylor Hill/Getty Images)

Conan O’Brien has taken his late-night show to places such as Finland, Ireland, Atlanta, Toronto, Chicago and Dallas. But his new venture is definitely one for the books as he makes a pit stop in Cuba.

The 51-year-old television host and a small crew have spent President’s Day weekend in the sunny streets of Cuba’s capital, Havana. But why?

SEE ALSO: Filming movies in Cuba remains elusive as the embargo continues

It turns out that the comedian and his Team Coco headed to the Caribbean island to film an upcoming episode for his TBS late-night program to air in March.

Conan O'Brien visits Cuba.

Conan O’Brien films the March 4th episode of his show in Havana, Cuba. (Photo: Twitter/@ConanOBrien)

“I just spent the last four days shooting my show all around the city of Havana. I made countless friends and had one of the best experiences of my life. Many laughs, but that could also be the rum. Watch ‪#‎ConanCUBA‬ March 4th,” he announced publicly on Facebook.

Conan’s show is making history, becoming the first time a U.S. late-night show has filmed in the country since the embargo began in 1962.

A news release from the show says the host spent “multiple days taking in the sights, sounds and culture of the country. The trip gives the ‘Conan’ audience a rare glimpse into the daily life of a country not often seen by American viewers,” according to CNN.

O’Brien picked the weekend before Presidents Day because his show doesn’t tape on the national holiday and would be available to travel, reports Deadline.

The last TV personality to film his show from Cuba was Jack Paar, who interviewed Fidel Castro for the “Tonight Show” in 1959 –despite the heavy criticism.

In December, President Obama announced that the U.S. would be moving to re-establish diplomatic relations with Cuba. However, it’s been quite a challenge for filmmakers who want to shoot on location, according to an interview with California-based attorney-producer Bill Martinez.

SEE ALSO: Netflix makes its entrance in Cuba

“The bottom line was really you couldn’t shoot any commercial film there,” Martinez recently told VOXXI, who in the past has assisted film crews interested in visiting Cuba. “What was allowed and really still allowed until we hear otherwise – from the Office of Cuban Affairs at the State Dept. – is the films that can be done there are more like documentaries.”

We wonder how Coco nailed it, but more so, we wonder what he and his memorable visit to Cuba have in stock for television viewers.

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