The 10 Best Commericials That Aired During The Super Bowl

Source: Pepsi / Cardi B for Pepsi


If there was a year that the big game ads had to deliver, 2019’s Super Bowl was it. There were definitely a lot of misses, but there were some commercials that hit the mark.

What Super Bowl?

That’s what a lot of viewers are saying after witnessing offensively deficient Sleeper Bowl where the MAGA Patriots struggled their way to a 6th championship. To make it through the defensive battle, fans stuck around for the Super Bowl spots that companies spend millions of dollars to get their products in front of the record number eyes that tune in for the big game.

Technology, as expected, was the forefront with artificial intelligence being the theme in a lot of the ads with Amazon’s virtual assistant getting a lot of shine. There was also a scary fascination with robots, but those ads didn’t quite hit the mark. But what caught our attention was John Legend adorably crooning while changing his son’s stinky diaper backed up by a bunch of singing father’s with this year’s Pepsi Halftime Show performer Adam Levine closing it out.

Other winners in the Super Bowl ad competition, Cardi B’s Pepsi ad featuring Steve Carell and Lil Jon, Chance Tha Rapper linking up with the Backstreet Boys to introduce a new Doritos flavor, the Bud Light Knight crossing over into the world of Game of Thrones, Marvel movie trailers from the upcoming Captain Marvel and Avengers: Endgame films. Microsoft’s  “We All Win” heartwarming spot highlighting its Adaptive Controller and the NFL 100 controller which most consider being the best ad the night.

If by any chance you missed them because you went to grab a snack, hit the bathroom or just tuned out from the Super Bowl altogether you can peep them all in the gallery below. Let us know which ones were your favorite and if we missed one in the comment section below.

Photo: Pepsi / Cardi B for Pepsi

What Super Bowl?: The 10 Best Commericials That Aired During The Sleeper Bowl was originally published on www.hiphopwired.com

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